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The Declaration of Internet Freedom act in usa

Discussion in 'Chatterbox' started by chrisfallout, Jul 3, 2012.

  1. chrisfallout

    chrisfallout Member

    http://asia.cnet.com/sign-the-declaration-of-internet-freedom-for-a-free-and-open-web-62217384.htm

    Do you believe the Internet needs protection against censorship and other threats? If so, then you may want to join in on the new Declaration of Internet Freedom.

    Launched by a large coalition of privacy groups, Web sites, and individuals, the Declaration of Internet Freedom is the start of a process striving to keep the Internet free and open. The organizations and people who kicked off this process are looking for other Internet users to discuss the ideas, share their own thoughts, and sign the declaration.

    "We've seen how the Internet has been under attack from various directions, and we recognize that it's time to make that stop," said TechDirt, one of the Web sites involved in the new movement. "The Internet is an incredible platform that we want to grow and to thrive, and thus, a very large coalition got together to produce the following document as a starting point, hoping to kick off a much larger discussion which we hope you'll join in."

    At this point, the Declaration of Internet Freedom advocates five basic principles:

    Expression: Don't censor the Internet.
    Access: Promote universal access to fast and affordable networks.
    Openness: Keep the Internet an open network where everyone is free to connect, communicate, write, read, watch, speak, listen, learn, create, and innovate.
    Innovation: Protect the freedom to innovate and create without permission. Don't block new technologies, and don't punish innovators for their users' actions.
    Privacy: Protect privacy and defend everyone's ability to control how their data and devices are used.

    People who want to sign the petition or share their opinions can do so at any number of Web sites, including TechDirt, Freepress, Accessnow, and the declaration's own site.

    For now, the declaration and its principles are still in the discussion stage, inviting people to debate the issues and offer their own opinions.

    But the groups behind this cause are clearly hoping the power of Internet users and Web sites can have an effect on Washington, especially in light of the defeat of the SOPA bill earlier this year.

    http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120701/22394419546/announcing-declaration-internet-freedom.shtml

    A whole bunch of organizations and individuals are getting together today to launch the beginning of a process, the creation of an Internet Declaration of Freedom. We've seen how the internet has been under attack from various directions, and we recognize that it's time to make that stop. The internet is an incredible platform that we want to grow and to thrive, and thus, a very large coalition got together to produce the following document as a starting point, hoping to kick off a much larger discussion which we hope you'll join in.

    We've set up our own Step2 discussion page where you can vote on the principles, discuss them, add your own ideas... whatever you'd like. You can, of course, also discuss them below in the comments. There are a number of other organizations setting up pages as well. The folks at Free Press have put up a Declaration of Internet Freedom site that lists out many of the organizations and individuals who were involved in putting this together and who are supporting the effort. There's also a subreddit and a Cheezburger page. Lots of other groups have set up action pages where you can take part as well, including EFF, Access and Free Press.

    We believe that a free and open Internet can bring about a better world. But to keep the Internet free and open, we must promote these principles in every country, every industry and every community. And we believe that these freedoms will bring about more creativity, more innovation and a better society.

    We are joining an international movement to defend our freedoms because we believe that they are worth fighting for.

    Let’s discuss these principles — agree or disagree with them, debate them, translate them, make them your own and broaden the discussion with your community — as only the Internet can make possible.

    Join us in keeping the Internet free and open.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. chrisfallout

    chrisfallout Member

    The Declaration of Internet Freedom act

    http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/technol...d-declaration-internet-freedom-221654205.html

    A growing number of tech companies and names are demanding basic, unalienable, digital rights

    It's no secret that various parts of the internet have been under attack for some time. Traditional media companies respond with terror at the thought of losing even more business to piracy (though it's questionable just how much they're actually hurting). Cable internet providers want the right to control what speeds you're allowed to access what sites at. And the U.S. government, meanwhile, wants to help these companies out by making streaming copyrighted content punishable by up to five years in prison.

    Some major names on the internet have had enough of playing defense. That's why they're launching a new initiative called the Declaration of Internet Freedom. It's a short five-point document — a Bill of Rights of sorts — that lists out the basics of what humanity should expect and deserve from the internet. It reads:

    "We stand for a free and open Internet. We support transparent and participatory processes for making Internet policy and the establishment of five basic principles:

    Expression: Don't censor the Internet.
    Access: Promote universal access to fast and affordable networks.
    Openness: Keep the Internet an open network where everyone is free to connect, communicate, write, read, watch, speak, listen, learn, create and innovate.
    Innovation: Protect the freedom to innovate and create without permission. Don’t block new technologies, and don’t punish innovators for their users' actions.
    Privacy: Protect privacy and defend everyone’s ability to control how their data and devices are used."

    The Declaration of Internet Freedom is supported by a number of well-known, high-tech names, such as Mozilla (creators of Firefox), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), left-wing political opinion site Daily Kos, and right-wing blogging heavyweight Patrick Ruffini. By backing the document, the organization hopes to promote understanding and build support for the cause. Private individuals are urged to take action through partner sites such as the non-profit Electronic Frontier Foundation.

    This article was written by Fox Van Allen and originally appeared on Tecca

    More from Tecca:

    7 things to start in the next 10 minutes to protect your online privacy
    4 high-tech ways the federal government is spying on private citizens
    Privacy Paranoia: 5 companies you should think twice before trusting