Live / life and work in Japan

CodeGeek

Akiba Citizen
Nov 2, 2010
5,192
1,854
Thanks, tylersailer, for your post. :)

I opt out because I'm not a native speaker. And it's nothing I would feel comfortable while doing. I don't mean that it would be boring or something like. I really wouldn't feel comfortable.

This and last week I had contact with an acquittance of mine which already lives and works in Japan. His opinion: "Everyone puts their pants on one leg at a time." (I hope that's the right saying in English) And that also counts for Japan and the people there. So even if you don't have an awesome resume it's possible to get a job there (and that acquittance doesn't have that). Also connections can help. So I'm trying not to worry about that too much. First I need to be fit in Japanese. Then I will take the next step. :)
 

EroMura777

Active Member
Apr 5, 2015
268
204
I wanted to open some threads about these topics, but for the moment being I'll write them for discussion here:

- Is there any city more open than the others to foreign residents in Japan?
- Calculating daily expenses in Japan (average): house renting, water/electricity/internet bills, food
- Is renting a house easy for foreigners? What are the requirements? It may be better to first rent a room at an inn? Sharing a house with a Japanese person, instead?
 
  • Like
Reactions: CodeGeek

Ceewan

Famished
Jul 23, 2008
9,199
16,509
  • Like
Reactions: CodeGeek

CodeGeek

Akiba Citizen
Nov 2, 2010
5,192
1,854
I wanted to open some threads about these topics, but for the moment being I'll write them for discussion here:

- Is there any city more open than the others to foreign residents in Japan?
- Calculating daily expenses in Japan (average): house renting, water/electricity/internet bills, food
- Is renting a house easy for foreigners? What are the requirements? It may be better to first rent a room at an inn? Sharing a house with a Japanese person, instead?
These are interesting topics. :) Eh, maybe except the first one. I have to say that it isn't that interesting at all and it will be surely hard to get an objective information about it as it depends a lot on the personal experience of oneself.

Thanks for the link. I will have a look at it later. :)
 

tylersailer

Member
Jan 24, 2011
69
61
I wanted to open some threads about these topics, but for the moment being I'll write them for discussion here:

- Is there any city more open than the others to foreign residents in Japan?
- Calculating daily expenses in Japan (average): house renting, water/electricity/internet bills, food
- Is renting a house easy for foreigners? What are the requirements? It may be better to first rent a room at an inn? Sharing a house with a Japanese person, instead?

Disclaimer: As Codegeek said it is impossible to get an objective information on these topics. What I shall write should not taken as hard facts. They are merely my observation and such.


1. If you mean "open" by "more foregin residents" then Shin Okubo in Tokyo (Korean town) or Yokohama and Yokosuka in Kanagawa (US base and China town) or Tsuruhashi in Osaka (Korean town) or Shimonoseki in Yamaguchi (Sea port city) or Nagasaki (sea port city). If you mean "open" by "friendly", then, I am afraid Japan is somewhat racist/discriminating nation towards non Japanese, so I cannot say much.


2. House rent in Tokyo (City area) is between 50,000 yen to 100,000 yen (USD 415 to USD 830) for one room unit. House rent in countryside is between 30,000 yen to 60,000 yen (USD 250 to USD500). The more the apartment house has rooms, the more expensive. More information on renting a house (provided by real estate agent company) is HERE.

Water bill for one month: 3,500 yen (USD30). Electricity for one month: 3,500 yen (USD 30). Food, aprx. 20,000 yen to 30,000 yen (USD165 to USD250) . Internet bill aprx 4,000 yen to 6,000 yen (subscription is usually 2 years long contract, fyi). Above figures are based on a single household. If you live with other people the figure should be higher.


3. Renting a house is EXTREMELY difficult for foreigners in some cases. Why? Simply put:

1) the landlord does not understand foreign languages nor have any knowledge about other culture.
2) They think ALL foreigners are crazy drinking party assholes making noises 24/7 and that they do not give a shit about Japanese etiquette.
3) real estate agents (who you deal with to rent a house) do not want to go extra mile to get you rent because they rather please landlords. They do not care about you.
4) Landlords believe you will run away when you fail to pay monthly rent bill. And they fear they cannot chase you down to your home country.

If you rent a house under your company name, then things will be easier because it is company that rents, not you. Thus landlords do not have to worry about anything (but still might refuse to rent to foreigners). I am not sure about any sort of requirement, but I do believe you need to have someone financially reliable as a personal reference. This applies when Japanese people rent a house as well so it is a common practice.

You can try Airbnb for a few days/weeks if it is cheaper than hotels. Besides the cost you can speak with the host for some tips and advices. Sharing a house is not so common in Japan but there are some. You need to really look for it though.


Just my thoughts. Hope this helps.